Live Long and Prosper, Leonard Nimoy

Written by Cameron Clark on February 27, 2015

 

“Change is the essential process of all existence.” — Spock

Leonard Nimoy, best known for his Star Trek role as Spock, the science officer, first officer and Captain Kirk’s right-hand man aboard the starship Enterprise, passed away today at the age of 83.

As the half-Vulcan, half-human Spock—a role he chose instead of one on the soap opera Peyton Place—Nimoy became a star on Star Trek and a global pop culture icon.

Dispassionate, brilliant, and unparalleled in his ability to run a tight ship whenever Captain Kirk found himself in precarious situations while exploring the outer reaches of space, Nimoy embodied a new, yet classic persona as Spock that made him the most beloved character on the show.

Away from the silver screen, Nimoy lived a fruitful life filled with a diverse array of creative passions. An avid photographer, Nimoy studied photography at UCLA after hitting it big, and even had work exhibited at the R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton, MA and at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

Nimoy also authored two volumes of autobiography. The first, titled I Am Not Spock, sparked controversy, with many fans viewing the book as an attempt to distance himself from the iconic role. 20 years later, however, Nimoy went on to publish the second volume. Titled I Am Spock, his second volume silenced critics as it offered an in-depth look at his lifelong closeness to the character he played, claiming that it helped him expand his personal and professional horizons.

Perhaps no better words can be used to describe and personify Nimoy than his own: “I think it’s my adventure, my trip, my journey, and I guess my attitude is, let the chips fall where they may.”

All of us at Hornblower remember Leonard Nimoy for his dedication to curiously navigating the vast reaches of the cosmos alongside his trusted colleagues, Captain Kirk and Dr. Leonard McCoy, aboard the starship Enterprise. If only our New York fleet could do his vessel justice.

Live long and prosper, Leonard Nimoy. You’ve earned it.

Check out these other tributes to Leonard Nimoy from around the web: